Daihatsu will show two incredible Copen concepts at the Tokyo Auto Salon

Next month, Japan will host another car auto show besides the Tokyo Motor Show. It is called Tokyo Auto Salon and favours tuning companies and customization solutions. Daihatsu has just released pictures of its main attractions at this event. Two of them are concepts based on the Copen kei car, but there is a good chance these versions will be available as production models in no time. First, because there is no industrial challenge in order to get them done. Second, because both look good as hell! In the main picture and in the one below, you can check the first one, the Shooting Brake. Who would not want a pocket shooting brake?

Daihatsu-Copen-Shooting-Brake-02

 

As all key cars, the Copen is not bigger than 3.5 m and uses a 0.66 engine, but it is a sports version of these cars. For starters, it is a roadster, with a retractable hard top. Sold in two versions, Cero and Robe, the car can be entirely changed very easily, as the picture below shows.

Daihatsu-Copen-Structure

You just have to change the body panels to have a Cero or a Robe version of the Copen. And these “concepts” are simply new body panels. Very nice ones, especially considering the Copen weighs only 850 kg and that it is powered by a 3-cylinder Topaz Neo 659 cm³ turbocharged engine that produces 47 kw at 6,400 rpm and 92 Nm at 3,200 rpm. The car is front-wheel drive.

In case you are not very fond of shooting brakes, you can choose the gorgeous Coupé version. It looks a lot like the Alfa Romeo 4C in a much smaller scale and would surely be accused of being a copycat of the Italian machine if Daihatsu was Chinese. Or would it not? Just check the pictures below to give your opinion.

Daihatsu-Copen-Coupe-03

There are no changes in the mechanics or in the suspension. It is basically a regular Copen with a much better looking body.

Daihatsu-Copen-Coupe-4

It would be nice to have kei cars in other countries of the world. The Copen is able to use only 4.5 liters of fuel per 100 km when it uses the 5-speed manual transmission or 3.97 liters per 100 km with the CVT. Eco-friendly, but in style.

 

Gustavo Henrique Ruffo

I have been an automotive journalist since 1998 and have worked for many important Brazilian newspapers and magazines, such as the local edition of Car and Driver and Quatro Rodas, Brazilian's biggest car magazine. I have also worked for foreign websites, such as World Car Fans and won a few journalism prizes, among them three SAE Journalism Awards and the 2017 IAM RoadSmart Safety Award. I am the author of "The Traffic Cholesterol", a book about bad drivers that you can buy at Hotmart, Google Play, Amazon and Kobo.