Mercedes-Benz releases video of the E-Class almost undisguised

The 10th generation of the Mercedes-Benz E-Class will be presented at the 2016 NAIAS with very impressive numbers. Most of them are released in this video below, but it is worth writing them down: 48 months of development, 1,200 prototypes built, 12 million km crossed, 3,500 m² of camouflage film used (equivalent to half a football field), testing in temperatures ranging -32ºC to 60ºC, 10,000 autonomous braking testings, prototypes tested in 4 different continents, 5,000 autonomous lane changes and 1,200 engineers involved. Regular cars take about 18 months to develop, with prototypes topping a few hundreds, if not dozens. The E-Class is obviously a very important car for Mercedes-Benz, but we would never imagine such an effort in order to get it right.

As the German automaker states, the E-Class will be presented in January 11, 2016, at the 2016 NAIAS. And the company has already revealed the car’s interior completely undisguised. Have a look at it below.

The dashboard is fully digital, something many luxury cars are getting, but that is mainly used to drop on costs. And it also reinforces a current perception among car lovers: if any modern car ever turns into a classic, it will not demand mechanics in order to keep running, but electronic technicians.

The new E-Class, called W213, will be built over a new modular platform, the MRA, the same one used by the C-Class and the S-Class, expected to make the new vehicles, both in sedan and station wagon bodies, up to 100 kg lighter than its predecessor. The car will have a drag coefficient of only 0.23 and will probably be 4.95 m long and 1.94 m wide.

 

Gustavo Henrique Ruffo

I have been an automotive journalist since 1998 and have worked for many important Brazilian newspapers and magazines, such as the local edition of Car and Driver and Quatro Rodas, Brazilian's biggest car magazine. I have also worked for foreign websites, such as World Car Fans and won a few journalism prizes, among them three SAE Journalism Awards and the 2017 IAM RoadSmart Safety Award. I am the author of "The Traffic Cholesterol", a book about bad drivers that you can buy at Hotmart, Google Play, Amazon and Kobo.