Karma introduces the Revero at US$ 130,000 a piece

The Karma Revero has finally had its official presentation yesterday in Laguna Beach, California. Although the company has been almost laconic in its press release, it has already disclosed its brochure, what helps us get the new car in some sense. We still miss some information, but not the main one: each new Revero will cost US$ 130,000.

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The Revero is basically a Fisker Karma with improvements. It is slightly different in dimensions, but preserves the same design that has made it attractive in its first market appearance. The Revero is 5 m long, 2.13 m wide (including mirrors), 1.33 m high and has a wheelbase of 3.16 m. Its curb weight is 2,449 kg, even with an aluminum structure. That’s a respectable amount of mass, but forgivable considering the level of luxury the car intends to offer. And its size.

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Instead of a 20.1 kWh lithium-ion battery pack, which gave the Karma a 51 km range only with a full charge, the Revero presents a 21.4 kWh pack. That is enough for an 80 km electric-only range. Some like to classify the Karma as a hybrid, but we name it for what it is: an electric car with a range extender. And so is the Revero. Instead of 194 kW, the 2.0 Ecotec turbocharged engine that works as a generator in the Revero delivers 175 kW, what makes perfect sense. We even wonder why Karma has decided to keep such a big generator under the hood, but this is probably due to development costs. The big generator ensures a total range of more than 480 km. With the advantage or not having to spend a lot of time waiting for a full recharge. The electric engines, the ones that really matter, provide 301 kW and amazing 1,330 Nm.

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As expected, the solar roof’s capability to power the car is very limited. Karma says the Revero can get 1.5 mile per day on solar recharge. If you don’t have to go farther than that every day, you can run your US$ 130,000 car solely on sun power… The truth is the solar roof is still useful only to power auxiliary systems of the car, such as the climate control.

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One of the main reasons for complaints has been changed. The infotainment system of the Fisker Karma was slow and unreliable. The problem has apparently been solved with the help of Rightware and its Kanzi user interface software. We will still need to hear from the first evaluations to confirm that things are better, but it is nice to hear Karma has addressed this. And managed to integrate all things into a pleasant interior.

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Karma has developed a long list of customization, such as the 6 interior choices (4 of them optional), the 6 different Brembo caliper color options and the 4 different wheels the buyer can ask.

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The Revero will have 8 color options, which you can see below.

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It still has a 200 km/h top speed limit, but a better acceleration time. Instead of 6.3 to go from 0 to 96 km/h, it spends only 5.4 s to reach that goal in Sport mode. With a 6.6 kW on-board charger, it can now recover 80% of its energy supply in about 24 minutes. In other words, you can get 64 km of range in a less than half an hour.

While the original Karma was built in Finland by Valmet, the Revero is manufactured in Moreno Valley, California. Life irony: when Fisker Automotive was an American company, it produced its car overseas. Now that it has changed its name to Karma and it Chinese controlled (by Wanxiang), its cars are American made. Wherever they are produced, we just hope they are more reliable and that they help this beautiful design from Henrik Fisker succeed at last.

Gustavo Henrique Ruffo

I have been an automotive journalist since 1998 and have worked for many important Brazilian newspapers and magazines, such as the local edition of Car and Driver and Quatro Rodas, Brazilian's biggest car magazine. I have also worked for foreign websites, such as World Car Fans and won a few journalism prizes, among them three SAE Journalism Awards and the 2017 IAM RoadSmart Safety Award. I am the author of "The Traffic Cholesterol", a book about bad drivers that you can buy at Hotmart, Google Play, Amazon and Kobo.